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August 10, 2009 Wordplay & Creative Literary License, open chat 1

The transcript below covers the complete #litchat conversation on August 10, 2009. The order appears sequentially from the first post to the final post. Topic was open discussion: Wordplay and Creative Literary License.

LitChat 3, 2, 1, #litchat begins now! Join us today for WORDPLAY & CREATIVE LITERARY LICENSE. -1:00 PM Aug 10th, 2009
ecurbmp RT: @LitChat: 3, 2, 1, #litchat begins now! Join us today for WORDPLAY & CREATIVE LITERARY LICENSE. -1:01 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat I’m here today, to my surprise. #litchat -1:02 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat RT @LitChat: 3, 2, 1, #litchat begins now! Join us today for WORDPLAY & CREATIVE LITERARY LICENSE. -1:02 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen hi all back after missing a few weeks #litchat -1:03 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs i’mhere with fingers crossedthat my tweets will show #litchat -1:04 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @VanessaDobbs me too been while since been here #litchat -1:04 PM Aug 10th, 2009
LitChat Are you ready for some fun with words? Send any questions to @LitChat w/out hashtag and I will post to chat. #litchat -1:05 PM Aug 10th, 2009
LitChat Q1 fm stujallen: Which writers affect language the most? #litchat -1:05 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @LitChat yes i am #litchat -1:05 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @VanessaDobbs I see you! 🙂 #litchat -1:06 PM Aug 10th, 2009
maggiedana Just signed in. Poor Twitter. It’s laboring again. #litchat -1:06 PM Aug 10th, 2009
NotJaneAusten @litchat Shameless promotion time! Blog: A ‘Tale’ for the Ages (re: ‘The Wet Nurse’s Tale’ ) http://bit.ly/14RMne #litchat -1:06 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @maggiedana It always seems to pick the time when the bookish people chat. Coincidence? Hm… #litchat -1:07 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog Q1: the writers who affect language the most are the ones who are willing to take risks. #litchat -1:07 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @LitChat q1 has to be james joyce he used morre words than anyother writer #litchat -1:07 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @maggiedana @kashicat it’s a conspiracy!!!!!! #litchat -1:07 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @LitChat Q1. I wonder what’s meant by “affect”? Change language? Use it most interestingly? #litchat -1:07 PM Aug 10th, 2009
maggiedana @kashicat It’s because we’re the most erudite. We don’t resort to shortcuts. We make Twitter’s life harder. #litchat -1:08 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @stujallen that was the first person to pop into my mind, too. #litchat -1:08 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @bibliofreakblog like joyce and the modernist and people like b s johnson oh hi by the way i m stu #litchat -1:08 PM Aug 10th, 2009
maggiedana Q1 To me, the writers who affect language the most are the writers I love the best. #litchat -1:09 PM Aug 10th, 2009
NotJaneAusten @litchat I believe Henry James used more words per sentence than anyone in history! #litchat -1:09 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @bibliofreakblog he was so inventive as a writer #litchat -1:09 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat There are/were certain authors that made me run to dictionary, & those were great reading experiences. Mervyn Peake, for eg. #litchat -1:10 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @stujallen yes, stream of consciousness did a lot to affect the literary world. #litchat -1:10 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog i know it sounds almost cliche now, but Shakespeare? #litchat -1:10 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour Meg Rosoff’s How I Live Now did a lot with language and has stuck with me. #litchat -1:10 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @maggiedana great answer Maggie #litchat -1:10 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @bibliofreakblog it did still does really #litchat -1:11 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bellamcguire I love the writers that throw curveballs with the english language, like Japser Fforde and Terry Pratchett #litchat -1:11 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat Shakespeare, I think, would certainly be one who’s had most lasting effect on language. Maybe not in his own time, but ongoing. #litchat -1:11 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog I’d also say that writers who use vernacular: Twain, Alcott, Kerouac, #litchat -1:12 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen italo calvino very cvlever writer too #litchat -1:12 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @kashicat I think that with Shakespeare, he both made up words and used slang that hadn’t been recorded before. #litchat -1:12 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @bibliofreakblog I thought Shakespeare and also RoaldDahl particularly his kids books #litchat -1:12 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @bibliofreakblog If you’re going w/vernacular, that would take us back to Chaucer too, wouldn’t it? #litchat -1:13 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @VanessaDobbs interesting, i hadn’t even thought about kids books #litchat -1:13 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @VanessaDobbs charlie etc great books #litchat -1:13 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TaraStaley @VanessaDobbs William Faulkner, adult. Speaking of kids, Shel Silverstein. #LitChat -1:13 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bellamcguire @VanessaDobbs I agree. Roald Dahl has stayed with me from the younger years right through til now. #litchat -1:13 PM Aug 10th, 2009
balletbookworm I think author’s who write phonetically to convey the sound of language (like Irvine Welsh in “Trainspotting”) stretch the language #litchat -1:13 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @VanessaDobbs DR SEUSS! #litchat -1:14 PM Aug 10th, 2009
maggiedana I read somewhere that the English language has more words than any other. Anyone else hear this? Am wondering if it’s true. #litchat -1:14 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @balletbookworm recording dialect is important, as Morrison or Twain. #litchat -1:15 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley Good timing–I was just thinking of jabberwocky today #litchat -1:15 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TwinkleChar Dr. Seuss. #litchat -1:15 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @maggiedana it is true. It’s because it tends to adopt words from other languages. #litchat -1:15 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @balletbookworm or gray too love welshs early books so thought proveking #litchat -1:15 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog How about writers who make up words and phrases? Huxley, Orwell, etc. #litchat -1:16 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @maggiedana Yep, that’s true. I read books about the history of English all the time. 🙂 #litchat -1:16 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @balletbookworm agree Richard Adams #litchat -1:16 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @bibliofreakblog orwell made so many common words big brother etc #litchat -1:16 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @balletbookworm sorry tweeted too soon Adams Plague dogs was in dialect #litchat -1:18 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley tricky when words wandered away so much from their roots so they’re hard to decipher #litchat -1:18 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TwinkleChar Hemmingway wrote at 7th grade leve, so it doesn’t always take big words. #litchat -1:18 PM Aug 10th, 2009
yessicamaher @maggiedana #litchat I’ve heard that. Unsure if it’s ethnocentricity or the fact that we borrow, steal & bastardize every other language. -1:19 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @bibliofreakblog Anthony Burgess #litchat -1:19 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TaraStaley @TwinkleChar rhythm is nice too #LitChat -1:19 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @VanessaDobbs yes anthony he was a great writer #litchat -1:19 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @kashicat which books would you recommend? #litchat -1:20 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @PamCallow you’re absolutely right; it’s like a map of history #litchat -1:21 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @CarlaBuckley That “wandering,” tho, is how language constantly works. e.g. “desert” & “jungle” used to mean same thing. #litchat -1:21 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @yessicamaher I think English growing/borrowing etc was orig’ly a freak of invasion patterns of England, then Brit Empire #litchat -1:21 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TaraStaley @yessicamaher seems to be constantly evolving–there is now an official ‘open dictionary’ I think done by Mirriam-Webster. #LitChat -1:22 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead had no luck with other account so trying this one. Litchat v hard to join today #litchat -1:22 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @CarlaBuckley @ Kashicat here’s one I recommend http://bit.ly/z4uHh #litchat -1:22 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass I think Arundhati Roy makes the English language dance and sing in THE GOD OF SMALL THINGS. #litchat -1:22 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @CarlaBuckley Sorry, hard to follow convo. Which books do you want recommendation about? #litchat -1:22 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley RT @bibliofreakblog: @CarlaBuckley @ Kashicat here’s one I recommend http://bit.ly/z4uHh #litchat THX -1:23 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @kashicat absolutely right. #litchat -1:23 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @CarlaBuckley @kashicat and also http://bit.ly/R7Fjj #litchat -1:23 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TwinkleChar @TaraStaley Yes. Rhythm extremely important and alluring. #litchat -1:23 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead hurray. This account’s working. It just wouldn’t let @wordnerdarmy in… 😦 #litchat -1:24 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @kashicat Sorry books on the “history of English” you mentioned earlier #litchat -1:24 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead are we still talking about impact on language or are we on something else now? #litchat -1:24 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @rebeccawoodhead are the bastards trying to get us down? #litchat -1:24 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour Modern English is a mixture of German, Norse, Friesian, Norman French, Gaelic and Latin. #litchat -1:24 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @bibliofreakblog Wonderful looking book! I must read it! I kiss your feet! #litchat -1:25 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour And Old English, clearly (duh!) #litchat -1:25 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs RT @mdbenoit: Yes! RT @CarolyBurnsBass: I think Arundhati Roy makes the English language dance and sing in THE GOD OF SMALL THINGS. #litchat -1:25 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @pitchparlour isn t every modern european language ? #litchat -1:26 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @CarlaBuckley One of the best, IMO, but might need searching for, is “Our Marvelous Native Tongue” by Richard Claiborne #litchat -1:26 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @pitchparlour Not to mention Hindi, with those added words like bungalo, pyjamas, etc… #litchat -1:26 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @kashicat etymology=one of my favoritest things. LOL. #litchat -1:26 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @bibliofreakblog @kashicat love the links! My head hurts. Thought I knew something, found out I know zip! #litchat -1:27 PM Aug 10th, 2009
fannyfae @CarolyBurnsBass I have heard of that book. I will have to check it out. #litchat -1:27 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @kashicat lovely. thanks for the reco. #litchat -1:27 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles Apologies joining late, excellent history of English book “Secret Life of Words” @henryhitchings #litchat -1:28 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @CarlaBuckley Also “The Power of Babel” by John McWhorter. More technical, but some fascinating stuff. #litchat -1:28 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @bibliofreakblog Let me guess. If you watch Jeopardy, you could run right thru the “Word Origins” category, right? Ha! #litchat -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead what are we talking about now. Arrived on time but account wouldn’t work so had to change account and now haven’t a clue #litchat -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @pitchparlour @kashicat @stujallen well with the exception of basque and Finnish, they’re all indo-european languages #litchat -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @kashicat Title’s intriguing. Pun on…words? (Tower of Babel) #litchat -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @hangingnoodles I’ll need to read “Secret Life of Words” too, obviously. 🙂 #litchat -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @rebeccawoodhead writers affecting language #litchat -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs RT @mdbenoit2: Still not appearing on #litchat. Sigh. -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles Linguists estimate English has absorbed (stolen/borrowed) words from 350 languages #litchat -1:29 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @kashicat it’s a new way of looking at things. Reflects the frenzied pace of current time. #litchat -1:42 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog I bet I’m the only one here who has ever heard of a parking structure. #litchat -1:42 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @bibliofreakblog As do the Finns, bizarrely. #litchat -1:42 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @rebeccawoodhead maybe be like blade runner in the end a blend of langs as one #litchat -1:42 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @bibliofreakblog @TaraStaley Interesting, about all the different thesauruses or the equivalent. #litchat -1:42 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @danish_novelist LOL! That’s too funny! #litchat -1:42 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @rebeccawoodhead I spent a summer there…and I can tell Irish from Brittish, but not say, Oxford from York. #litchat -1:42 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes @kashicat & I guess Burgess created new language that was actually old some of which entered slang (“droogs” for e.g.) #litchat -1:43 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead ‘LOL’ worries me. There should be more subtle humorous responses like ‘SITC’ (Snort into tea-cup chuckling) #litchat -1:43 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat RT @kashicat Still lot of diff’s between UK & US word meanings. And we Canadians know both, & have to switch back & forth #litchat -1:43 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley Writers should be changing language. Words are our tools, wordplay our jobs. #litchat -1:43 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes Waht about instances of authors picking up street language/slang & their work “mainstreaming” it? Sorry, question not answer #litchat -1:43 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @bcmystery It’s a Britishism, isn’t it? How about klicks for kilometers? #litchat -1:44 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles Many other langs don’t need thesauri RT @kashicat: @bibliofreakblog @TaraStaley thesauruses. #litchat -1:44 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @bibliofreakblog do you mean Irish from English or Irish from Scottish, say? #litchat -1:44 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @rebeccawoodhead I MCAT (mildly chuckled at that). #litchat -1:44 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @hangingnoodles Hurray for “HumoUr”! /Canadian #litchat -1:44 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @rebeccawoodhead or cowye (choke on what you’re eating) ! #litchat -1:45 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @agnieszkasshoes I think you’re right. And remember too, the early Sci Fi writers who named things before they were invented #litchat -1:45 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles Couldn’t agree more! RT @CarlaBuckley: Writers should be changing language. Words are our tools, wordplay our jobs. #litchat -1:45 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @bibliofreakblog I SIG (stifled inward giggle) #litchat -1:45 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @CarlaBuckley @bcmystery I think that “klicks” is a military thing. #litchat -1:45 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @agnieszkasshoes Yes yes, it is, surely? Ellis was very influential for Jeff Lindsay and a whole raft of other early 21C writers. #litchat -1:45 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TaraStaley @kashicat I’ve always wondered why American English drops the ‘ur’ from a lot of words like favoUR and humoUR…. #LitChat -1:45 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @kashicat I have to admit, I’m American and think the UK’s got the right spelling of many things, “grey,” for example #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @thebookaddict 🙂 SMOON (snort milk out of nose) #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @pitchparlour sorry maybe your right #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes @pitchparlour The Finnish author I know (the wonderful Heikki Hietala) writes the most elegant English of anyone I know #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat I saw website where entire programming lang. was being invented using LOLCat language. Loved it! #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @rebeccawoodhead both. Irish from English is easier that Irish from Scottish. Oh, and then there’s the Aussies… #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat @rebeccawoodhead My only quibble is the dread spread of TLA (three letter acronyms) #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @hangingnoodles Tricky line, though, since we also have to be able to communicate clearly… #litchat -1:46 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @CarlaBuckley But do you think writers change language always, or reflect languages? Lang. kind of evolves on its own, usually. #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @rebeccawoodhead but that’s sorta contextual…one has to be drinking milk in that case. #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley I blame my dad for misleading me 🙂 RT @bibliofreakblog: @CarlaBuckley @bcmystery I think that “klicks” is a military thing. #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes @pitchparlour he said = cos Finns think in passive & have 2 make effort 2 translate it so all voice=active & smooth & considered #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
danish_novelist @CarlaBuckley I’m a great abuser of your fine language. I molest your verbs. I crucify English every single day #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @stujallen Very rare! Now I’m all fired up about Finnish. #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead wondering whether to explain England and Britain aren’t same or whether to let it sit and annoy Scottish friends. Go with latter. #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen i thought we where talking about writers not lingustics end of the day it lit chat not lang chat !!!!!!!!!!!!! #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @jjochwat Like PMS…which then becomes a verb as in I’m PMS (I’m Pre-menstrual Syndroming). #litchat -1:47 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat @TaraStaley I’ve always wondered why Am. English drops the ‘ur’ from a lot of words #LitChat — B/c spelling is a virus from outer space. -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 Hi litchat! sorry I’m late, stupid meetings! #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @rebeccawoodhead another good one =D #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles @CarlaBuckley Agree tis tricky but non literalness is key to much coloUrful and powerful writing #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
LitChat Woot! TweetChat finally caught up to the feed. Wonder how many tweets were dropped. #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
LisaKenney @agnieszkasshoes Yes re: idiom/voice Irvine Welsh, Anthony Burgess -getting into that dialect while reading made those books for me #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @TaraStaley I think it was Ben Franklin (or Noah Webster?) who went thru language & made it more “efficient” for Americans. #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @kashicat excellent point–lang does evolve, but writers also can play a role. #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @rebeccawoodhead I know…I am just forgetful/don’t care. #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @bibliofreakblog and the South Africans and people from New Zealand. Our language gets about. Little slut! #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @agnieszkasshoes Mr P’s friend Timo is Finnish and he speaks the most correct English of anyone I know. Especially when drunk. #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley ROFL RT @danish_novelist: I’m a great abuser of your fine language. I molest your verbs. I crucify English every single day #litchat -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat RT @rebeccawoodhead: @thebookaddict 🙂 SMOON (snort milk out of nose) #litchat [My fave so far] -1:48 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @kashicat Gotta love lol cats! Hours of entertainment there! #litchat -1:49 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @jjochwat Soon those acronyms are likely to become words in their own right, w/added vowels. (Like “radar” which is acronym too.) #litchat -1:49 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen sorry i m a reader not a linguist #litchat -1:49 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 RT @danish_novelist: I’m a great abuser of your fine language. I molest your verbs. I crucify English every single day #litchat #litchat -1:49 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @danish_novelist what is the difference for you writing in English as opposed to writing in Danish? #litchat -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bcmystery @bibliofreakblog @CarlaBuckley Did I mention something about klicks? I cannae remember. #litchat -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @stujallen Sorry. We frequently end up veering off on tangents like this. 😦 #litchat -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes @kashicat writers must reflect idiom enough that people accept the change & own it as theirs (like sketch shows do) #litchat -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @bcmystery once upon a time… #litchat -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @agnieszkasshoes That would make sense. Thanks for your comments btw. #litchat -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pussreboots RT @kashicat: I saw website where entire programming lang. was being invented using LOLCat language. Loved it! #litchat and lolcat bible too -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TwinkleChar @hangingnoodles cannot speak Ur language. U r very intimidating with all that vowel-interruptus. I am outlclassed for sUre. #litchat -1:50 PM Aug 10th, 2009
danish_novelist @bibliofreakblog Writing in English gives me new freedom. After 12 novels back home I need a change #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @bcmystery Um. Maybe? #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog Here’s what I don’t get: why do Brits say “Happy Christmas” and N. Americans say “Merry Christmas”. #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs me too!RT @stujallen: sorry i m a reader not a linguist #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @agnieszkasshoes I think Capek invented word “Robot” & Asimov ran with it. But that’s vague recollection& I cd be wrong. (or RONG) #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes @kashicat come 2 think of it, sketch shows R writing & HUGELY infuential on language Fast Show, Lit Brit etc #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @danish_novelist do you translate your own work? #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles Most chucklesome RT @TwinkleChar: @hangingnoodles cannot speak Ur language. U r very intimidating with all that vowel-interruptus. #litchat -1:51 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 I think linguistics adds a lot to the readers perception of characters and setting. If properly done… #litchat -1:52 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @pussreboots Oh gosh, I’ve heard of LOLCat Bible but not sure I’ve seen it. #litchat -1:52 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bcmystery @CarlaBuckley @bibliofreakblog I’m totally confused now. Which differs from my normal state not one klick. #litchat -1:52 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @hangingnoodles I am always working to sneak in a non-word in my work, because the real words just don’t give enough options #litchat -1:52 PM Aug 10th, 2009
danish_novelist @bibliofreakblog No, Tiina Nunnaly translated THE TSAR’S DWARF. The next one I’m writing in English #litchat -1:52 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @bibliofreakblog That’s something to do with the Coke advertising campaign in late 1890s, will remember and tweet back. #litchat -1:52 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat @danish_novelist #litchat That settles it: After I write 10 more in English, I’m switching to Finnish! -1:52 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @TaraStaley From Claiborne’s bk – eventually new pidgin/creole languages HAVE to devel. own grammar, formality etc to be useful #litchat -1:53 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen @VanessaDobbs we ve drift of to another place here #litchat -1:53 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @pitchparlour makes sense…so much of our Christmas stuff comes from that. #litchat -1:53 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @bibliofreakblog it’s not English people that get offended, it’s the other people in Britain. Understandably #litchat -1:53 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @bibliofreakblog I like Happy Christmas…I’m not British, but I say them both! Who says we can’t use Happy Xmas over here anyway?! #litchat -1:53 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @CarlaBuckley I have a feeling the evolving/writing thing is like nature/nurture. Both happen, and have influence #litchat -1:53 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass @CarlaBuckley I do that too… I invent words when I can’t find one that truly fits the essence of my need. #litchat -1:53 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @bibliofreakblog I should find it rather sad, but in a way I like it! #litchat -1:54 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @thebookaddict Hallmark. #litchat -1:54 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @bcmystery so sorry! I actually didn’t see you refer to klicks, but I’m not getting all the comments on #litchat -1:54 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 speaking of creative literary license, I used to have Poetic license…my license plate said “POETIC,” but no one got it 😦 #litchat -1:54 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TwinkleChar @CarolyBurnsBass It’s very satisfying to verb a nonverb word (found poem!) #litchat -1:54 PM Aug 10th, 2009
danish_novelist @jjochwat LOL You should probably settle for a translation #litchat -1:54 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles @CarlaBuckley psycholinguists have measured impact of novelty in lang, esp functional shift – Shakespeare used it a lot #litchat -1:55 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @kashicat glad you like it. #litchat -1:55 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat RT@CarolyBurnsBass I invent words when I can’t find one that fits the my need. #litchat [I’m about to write an entire book that way!] -1:55 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @VanessaDobbs Sorry about this tangent. 😦 #litchat -1:55 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes @LisaKenney yes, it’s creating whole & believable world view, & making reader want 2 carry some of that world 2 their lives #litchat -1:55 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 @CarolyBurnsBass @carlabuckley Shakespeare did that a LOT, hence creating multitudes of words we use commonly to this day. #litchat -1:55 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @bibliofreakblog right! Good one! #litchat -1:55 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @CarolyBurnsBass For me, it started back in seventh grade, when I really felt “thusly” had some staying power. Alas. #litchat -1:56 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 RT @TwinkleChar @CarolyBurnsBass It’s very satisfying to verb a nonverb word. #litchat -1:56 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @TwinkleChar wait, did you just make verb into a verb? That’s awesome. #litchat -1:56 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @bibliofreakblog we say both – and ‘Kewl Yule’ #litchat -1:56 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat RT @jjochwat: @danish_novelist #litchat That settles it: After I write 10 more in English, I’m switching to Finnish! [Hahahaha!] -1:56 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @hangingnoodles No kidding. #litchat -1:56 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat @corb21 @TwinkleChar @CarolyBurnsBass It’s very satisfying to verb a nonverb word. #litchat “Verbing weirds language.” (Hobbes, comic tiger) -1:57 PM Aug 10th, 2009
pitchparlour @bibliofreakblog Yes, it is that. They combined wishing drinkers a Merry Christmas and a HNY on a poster, hence the need for merry. #litchat -1:57 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TwinkleChar @bibliofreakblog HOO-HA! Yes I indeedy did. I have my moments. #litchat -1:57 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @corb21 Well, if Bill did it, then so say we all (Battlestar ref, I’ve been wanting to get that phrase going…) #litchat -1:57 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @hangingnoodles So you mean, if a few new or unique words appear in book, it makes readers take more notice? #litchat -1:57 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 @TwinkleChar I think nonverbs are verbed more often these days…. Google, Wiki, happens a lot with technology especially. #litchat -1:57 PM Aug 10th, 2009
rebeccawoodhead @pitchparlour the coke ad was in the 50s. Santa Claus is an invention of the Coca Cola corporation. We have Father Christmas #litchat -1:57 PM Aug 10th, 2009
TaraStaley @jjochwat nouning around #LitChat -1:58 PM Aug 10th, 2009
danish_novelist @jjochwat Writing a blog (DANISH ACCENT) helps me to write in English. You should do the same when you venture into Finnish 🙂 #litchat -1:58 PM Aug 10th, 2009
stujallen back on twitter after chat on #litchat -1:58 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @bibliofreakblog I think I’ll come out with a line of Christmas cards that use Happy Christmas instead of Merry Christmas! #litchat -1:58 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @bibliofreakblog Yes, “verbing” a noun is a big practice, and criticized a lot in many places. Heh. #litchat -1:58 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @bibliofreakblog or I’ll write a Christmas book that used Happy instead of Merry! #litchat -1:59 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @thebookaddict you could probably sell those to literary types. #litchat -1:59 PM Aug 10th, 2009
agnieszkasshoes OK, looks like it’s bath time. Will catch up & follow new friends 2morrow. Wonderful topic. Twas brillig #litchat -1:59 PM Aug 10th, 2009
hangingnoodles @kashicat yes, functional shift recruits more of the brain as you read/hear, makes more memorable, have specifics in my book #litchat -1:59 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat @danish_novelist A blog first? You’re being WAY too sensible. No the Finnish-English dictionary opens when I write page one!! #litchat -2:00 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog What? Are done already? I have to go do ironing now? #litchat -2:00 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict @bibliofreakblog Most definitely! #litchat -2:00 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @thebookaddict just the colours he wears are, it is short for st Nicholas which is german he wore green before coca cola got at him #litchat -2:00 PM Aug 10th, 2009
jjochwat Getting roped into a meeting. Adios, #litchat ters! -2:01 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @thebookaddict Don’tknow why but Ialways say happy christmas #litchat -2:01 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @hangingnoodles I agree–inserting a new word has to be done skillfully or it loses impact. Poetry does this well, natch #litchat -2:02 PM Aug 10th, 2009
bibliofreakblog @GrammarGirl oh, you should have been on #litchat today…it devolved into the origin and discrepancies in language. -2:02 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 @CarlaBuckley Let’s everyone do it then, so says I! #litchat -2:02 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @VanessaDobbs Santa/St. Nick/Father Xmas has very long, dignified, powerful pre-Coke history, doesn’t he? #litchat -2:03 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @thebookaddict sorry tweet re santaclaus answer to @rebeccawoodhead #litchat -2:03 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 @jjochwat since when is wierding nessisarily a bad thing? #litchat -2:03 PM Aug 10th, 2009
CarlaBuckley @corb21 I feel the power 🙂 So say we all! #litchat -2:03 PM Aug 10th, 2009
LitChat Fun chat today, but alas, we’re at the end our our hourly #litchat. Join us again on Wednesday for more WORDPLAY chat. #litchat -2:03 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict anyone know what will be discussed on Wednesday? #litchat -2:04 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 @CarolyBurnsBass would love to read that non-word book of new words. #litchat -2:04 PM Aug 10th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @kashicat he certainly does #litchat -2:04 PM Aug 10th, 2009
thebookaddict Oh, @litchat already answered my question! #litchat -2:04 PM Aug 10th, 2009
kashicat @bibliofreakblog We may have to start a #lingchat or something one of these days. 🙂 #litchat -2:05 PM Aug 10th, 2009
corb21 @kashicat don’t know if I could handle that kind of excitement. I LOVED Ling 101 in college. Working has slowed my brainpower… #litchat -2:08 PM Aug 10th, 2009
LitChat Remember @hangingnoodles, author of I’M NOT HANGING NOODLES ON YOUR EARS, will be with us on Friday at 4 p/et. #litchat -2:08 PM Aug 10th, 2009
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