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05-06-09 Literary Fiction, open chat

The transcript below covers the complete #litchat conversation on May 6, 2009. The order appears sequentially from the first post to the final post. Topic was open discussion of literary fiction.

LitChat Welcome to LitChat. We’re continuing our talk about literary fiction. You can read transcrpt from Mon http://www.litchat.wordpress.com. #litchat -1:01 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 I’m here! Let’s go! Bring on the LitQuestions! #litchat -1:01 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat Q1: If literary fiction is the literature that sticks around for the future, why don’t more people read it today? #litchat -1:02 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat I’m in the TweetChat room, which had some issues on Monday. I’ll follow chat directly on Twitter and RT any missed tweets. #litchat -1:03 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 oooh good question. I think that it takes time for people to realize the greatness in a work. #litchat -1:04 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 And more time still for those people to band together to make what is currently obscure popular and then timeless. #litchat -1:04 PM May 6th, 2009
Nobilis @LitChat #litchat Dickens was the “popular” fiction of his day. Pubbed in magazines, read by everyone. -1:04 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @litchat question maybe for later… why does literary fiction so often win prestigious awards yet so hard to get published? #litchat -1:05 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 I think it really has to do with the Marketing of the product. Literary fiction is not promoted on the same level. #litchat -1:05 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @corb21 I agree itisoftenwhen people have read lots of reviews etc that they choose to read the book to find out what they’ve misse #litchat -1:06 PM May 6th, 2009
Nobilis @litchat #litchat You can’t predict what will be remembered and revered and what won’t. -1:06 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven Hi all. @litchat, love this question. Is it not marketed at same level b/c readers are lazy and just want happy endings? #litchat -1:07 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat @jdistraction On Monday we discussed the difficulties of publishing lit fic. Check out the chatscript http://www.litchat.wordpress.com. #litchat -1:07 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @shellshock62 I agree, the marketing often makes the book…but, typically lit fic isn’t pushed as hard on the masses. #litchat -1:07 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven I’m being a bit of a “printer’s devil’s advocate” with last question, I’ll admit… 🙂 #litchat -1:08 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 I agree that often readers are looking for a quick, fun read. Don’t want to really think, just enjoy. #litchat -1:08 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @thebookmaven I think it’s not marketed at the same level because it’s not what the masses want. #litchat -1:08 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @thebookmaven Also think lit fic is harder to market because it’s so varied. Genre fiction is easier to target. #litchat -1:08 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @shellshock62 no but word of mouth from people who have read the book must help.I’ve read lit fic recommended by this way #litchat -1:08 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 @corb21 that’s what I mean. The publishers and publicist are not pushing lit fiction. #litchat -1:09 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 @VanessaDobbs Word of Mouth is good, and a wonderful way to learn about new books, but it still limits exposure. #litchat -1:10 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @jdistraction Good point. But again, is that b/c readers are lazy, or publishers? Or both? Neither? #litchat -1:10 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @shellshock62 As a publicist, with more than one lit fic type title…it’s also VERY hard to push on readers. #litchat -1:10 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 Forums like #litchat are good, because this is a Mass “Word of Mouth” platform to help promote all types of literature. #litchat -1:10 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @corb21 I sadly agree. Yet I’ve found that when “masses” do find lit fic they love, incredibly loyal/BIG word of mouth sales… #litchat -1:11 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs Genre fiction is also easier to get hold of egstocked in supermarkets. #litchat -1:11 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass Great books connect with readers on many levels. It’s the connection to the human spirit that gives a book a long shelf life. #litchat -1:11 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @CarolyBurnsBass Lovely! Starring your tweet. #litchat -1:12 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 We’ve become a society seeking instant gratification, which is not always the case with literary fiction. #litchat -1:12 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction Also, I think generally genre fiction is more removed from reality – fantasy, thriller, mystery. I think escapism is big. #litchat -1:12 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @CarolyBurnsBass hear hear #litchat -1:13 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 Most literary fiction can’t be enjoyed and understood in one sitting. Therefore it doesn’t fit the mold of what many want today. #litchat -1:13 PM May 6th, 2009
BookingIt Many people read to escape, prefer easy route. Series are good for this, because reader knows what they will get. #litchat -1:13 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @shellshock62 People used to be much more patient about their gratification, at least with reading. #litchat -1:14 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm re Q1, it’s a combo of things, I’ve most often heard “too long” or “too boring” ex. person reading P&P “sequel” but never the orig #litchat -1:14 PM May 6th, 2009
darwilli040 @shellshock62 Perhaps a bad analogy, but lit fiction is like a PBS mini series as opposed to one on NBC. You expect more from PBS. #litchat -1:14 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass @thebookmaven. So true the WOM sales. Books like TIME TRAVELER’S WIFE had quiet sales, then WOM took over. #litchat -1:14 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @shellshock62 Very well said. People get nervous with stories that require rumination. We’re all so anxious today! #litchat -1:15 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs many people like myself read differently at different times.Sometimes devour genre fiction particularly when working as escapism. #litchat -1:15 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction LOL – Twitter psychology at play? Instant gratification = no patience for books? #litchat -1:15 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 RT @thebookmaven @CarolyBurnsBass Lovely! Starring your tweet. #litchat (Ditto!) #litchat -1:15 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat If you have a literary fiction question for today’s #litchat, please @me and I’ll post to the chat. -1:15 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 @corb21 Why do you find it hard to push to readers? What are you finding as a response to why there is little interest. #litchat -1:16 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @darwilli040 good analogy #litchat -1:16 PM May 6th, 2009
BookingIt My book club is usually happy they read literary fiction, but need motivation of club meeting to sit and read it. Me too, actually. #litchat -1:16 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @jdistraction Dunno. I am big old TweetQueen but also one of world’s biggest readers of litfic. #litchat -1:16 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @thebookmaven In my experience even that takes a while…not “overnight” success like genre fiction. #litchat -1:16 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @shellshock62 To be fair, I suppose it’s hard to push to booksellers in order to get it in front of readers. #litchat -1:17 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven Someone has got to wrangle this bunch! RT @litchat If u hv lit fic ? for #litchat pls @me & I’ll post to chat #litchat -1:18 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @corb21 errr, a lot of booksellers would like to push litfic but often those aren’t the ARCs we get #litchat -1:18 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @VanessaDobbs Absolutely! I go on mystery binges and thriller binges regularly. #litchat -1:18 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @thebookmaven Think you maybe the (welcomed) exception, not the rule. #litchat -1:19 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @BookingIt If book clubs are adopting it that certainly helps. #litchat -1:19 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm go maven, go! #litchat -1:19 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @balletbookworm Ah-HA. I wondered about this. PRs withholding lit-fic? #litchat -1:19 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @thebookmaven i see a lot of chick lit come in, mysteries, etc., but something like Littell’s LUCKY ONES or SPIVET we didn’t see #litchat -1:20 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @balletbookworm I guess I sent arcs to the wrong booksellers. You want a litfic, DM me your address and I’ll send you a final. #litchat -1:20 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @corb21 ARC’s? #litchat -1:20 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @darwilli040 Love this analogy but as host of PBS-branded web program, know that while much is expected fr PBS, too few WATCH. #litchat -1:20 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs Also helps if picked up by TV bookshows eg Oprah, Richard and Judy #litchat -1:20 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell Popping into the conversation a tad late & trying to get up to speed. #litchat -1:21 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat @jdistraction ARCs are Advance Reader Copies, sent to booksellers, book reviewers and other media outlets. #litchat -1:21 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @balletbookworm I have same problem; some think only WaPoBoWo & NYTBR are “worthy.” Not you, @corb21! #litchat -1:21 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @jdistraction Advanced Reader’s Copy #litchat -1:22 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass So true. Just like litfic. Great content, fewer readers. #litchat -1:22 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @corb21 really? awesome! #litchat -1:23 PM May 6th, 2009
BrooksSigler @thebookmaven Well, we of Tweeter think you are the bomb, clearly! #litchat -1:23 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @balletbookworm Yes, really. #litchat -1:23 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @EliseBlackwell We’re solving world’s problems, namely: How do we get more peeps to read and market lit fic? #litchat -1:24 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @BrooksSigler 🙂 You are warming my tired heart. Thank goodness for authors of lit fic!!! #litchat -1:24 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell On-line, regional, & specialty reviews are increasingly imp. to literary writers as print book reviews shrink/disappear. #litchat -1:25 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @BrooksSigler @thebookmaven yup, bomb-digady! #litchat -1:25 PM May 6th, 2009
BrooksSigler @thebookmaven That is the age-old question. I certainly have trouble selling lit fic to my students. #litchat -1:25 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @CarolyBurnsBass So true and so interesting. But want more Antiques Roadshow, less “Hit Man: David Foster & Friends!” #litchat -1:26 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell @thebookmaven = great friend to literary fiction, & the diversification of outlets, reviews, publ may wind up being great for lit. #litchat -1:27 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @EliseBlackwell True. Blog reviews and blog tours more and more important, I think. #litchat -1:27 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell @BrooksSigler I can usually get students to try writing lit fiction by telling them the exercise will help their genre stuff. #litchat -1:28 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @EliseBlackwell 🙂 Gosh, everyone — talk amongst yourselves. I’m having a moment! #litchat -1:28 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat Q2: Literary fiction has perception of being dry, slow and writerly. What current lit fic books are considered page turners? #litchat -1:29 PM May 6th, 2009
BrooksSigler @EliseBlackwell I don’t usually have as much trouble getting students to write it as to read it. #litchat -1:29 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell There are so many interesting things going on in on-line lit (experiments in serialization, etc), but there is zero $ there. #litchat -1:29 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm i think also people are OK with mediocre; they don’t push for more/better in both what they read and write #litchat -1:29 PM May 6th, 2009
BrooksSigler Some people have found 2666 to be a page-turner of sorts. But man, there are many pages to turn. #litchat -1:30 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @balletbookworm YES! There’s much more emphasis now on just getting it out there. Authors often have short, strict deadlines. #litchat -1:30 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @LitChat Great question re lit fic page turners. Does DROOD count, or is that genre? I think it’s both lit fic AND genre/thriller. #litchat -1:30 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen maybe takes time for the best to rise to the surface lot of great lit wasn t popular when published #litchat -1:30 PM May 6th, 2009
artepublico @LitChat City of Thieves #litchat -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven Another lit fic page turner: OSCAR WAO #litchat -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @thebookmaven ooh, ooh, DROOD! Read pretty much the whole thing in one shot and drooled all over it, too #litchat -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
Thandelike who’s doing interesting online serialization of literary fiction? #litchat -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs I loved a thousand splendid suns #litchat -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
BrooksSigler @stujallen Yes, we mentioned that in our discussion the other day–lit fic doesn’t always get recognition in the author’s lifetime. #litchat -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @LitChat I’m a little late to #litchat, but lit fic isn’t easy, & that’s not 4 every1. Just read The English Patient & felt was over my head -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven @balletbookworm What else is droolworthy…hmmmm…any Richard Russo! #litchat -1:31 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen foer and will self both great page turners #litchat -1:32 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @trishheylady I grew up thinking that was the definition of lit fic… #litchat -1:32 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm I think Diane Setterfield’s The Thirteenth Tale falls into the litfic category #litchat -1:32 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @thebookmaven I LOVE Richard Russo. Definitely on the list. #litchat -1:32 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell @Thandelike FiveChapters.com for one. They run a story per week in 5 sections, M-F. Not sure about quality longer stuff. #litchat -1:32 PM May 6th, 2009
thebookmaven Alas, have to run. Can’t wait for @eliseblackwell’s Friday #litchat! Have a great evening, everyone. #litchat -1:32 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 …now I know it’s more than that and deeper than that. #litchat -1:33 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 @thebookmaven I’m going to have to take another look at Oscar Wao, I just couldn’t get into it. #litchat -1:33 PM May 6th, 2009
bostonbibliophl Cutting for Stone is a wicked page turner. #litchat -1:33 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @litchat Are ppl reading less lit fiction now or is it just more apparent now that ppl have more choices? #litchat -1:33 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen just got oscar wao looking forward to it #litchat -1:34 PM May 6th, 2009
shellshock62 Great chatting with you guys, but I’ve got to run. #litchat -1:35 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @trishheylady Both, I think. Ppl are reading less because there are so many choices. #litchat -1:35 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @LitChat Cdn bestseller list is mostly CDN literary + US genre fiction. What does that say about Canadian readers/writers? #litchat. -1:35 PM May 6th, 2009
BooksOnTheBrain @shellshock62 @thebookmaven I read Oscar Wao with my book club- reviews were mixed but I liked it a lot #litchat -1:36 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass Loved OSCAR WAO, hated SPLENDID SUNS. Both tragic, but WAO had hope, SPLENDID was continually dark. #litchat -1:36 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @LoranneBrown Americans need to escape? #litchat -1:36 PM May 6th, 2009
booksquare @thebookmaven i just like those words: richard russo #litchat -1:36 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @jdistraction So you think it’s too many choices overloads people? #litchat -1:37 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell Book clubs are a great way to read literary fiction, bounce readings off each other, share conflicting opinions. And drink wine! #litchat -1:37 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @jdistraction well, reading less and reading the fluff that is constantly coming out #litchat -1:37 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @CarolyBurnsBass haven’t read Oscar wao.May read on yr recommendation #litchat -1:37 PM May 6th, 2009
Chrisbookarama I read Come Thou, Tortoise and it had a happy ending. Not sure if it’s literary fiction though. #litchat -1:38 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell Choice is also a problem w/in books. ~3,500 books are published in the U.S. every WEEK. Hard for a worthy novel to get attention. #litchat -1:38 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @jdistraction Americans need to escape? Sad indictment of society, no? 🙂 #litchat -1:38 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @trishheylady it prohibits them from thinking for themselves and forces many to become lemming readers #litchat -1:38 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @trishheylady Yes, and we’re fascinated by the latest cool thing… #litchat -1:38 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @EliseBlackwell Yes, book clubs can be a great way to eat through tough material together! #litchat -1:39 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @LoranneBrown Absolutely. #litchat -1:39 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @EliseBlackwell AMEN to that! #litchat -1:39 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @EliseBlackwell Re choice: Good point. Cdn market is smaller, but media more focused perhaps. #litchat -1:39 PM May 6th, 2009
jodyreale I wonder if the economy could in some way boost reading in general as a cheap, easy way to entertain oneself. #litchat -1:40 PM May 6th, 2009
darwilli040 @LitChat Proulx & McCarthy were considered litfic prior to movies but now are ‘main-stream’. Seems there is an either/or factor. #litchat -1:40 PM May 6th, 2009
mybooktweets @thebookmaven Wow for Oscar Wao and anything Richard Russo. Couldn’t agree more #litchat -1:41 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen i feel that tv book clubs and awards tend to narrow peoples choices to 20 or 30 novels #litchat -1:41 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @EliseBlackwell I definitely feel that way. Overwhelmed by my choices (and how to know what’s really good). #litchat -1:41 PM May 6th, 2009
Chrisbookarama @LoranneBrown Do you think there is less CDN genre fic? I can only think of Kelley Armstrong as one. #litchat -1:41 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @jodyreale possibly, at this point the average movie ticket costs more than a MM paperback, but we just have to get them to read it #litchat -1:41 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @jodyreale Indie Bound is trying to do that… #litchat -1:42 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @jodyreale That makes so much sense! I don’t think it’s happening, though. Why? #litchat -1:42 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @corb21 And it doesn’t have to be difficult! But I think it has that reputation. Complaint from bk club: lit fic is so HEAVY & DARK #litchat -1:42 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @darwilli040 does it matter as long as they are read? #litchat -1:42 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @EliseBlackwell Bookclubs are/were one fave way to promote my novel. Wld prefer arena-sized crowds, but only JKRowling can do it. #litchat -1:42 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat Q3 From @stujallen: Who do people feel out of the younger generation of the us writers will go on to be great writer? #litchat -1:43 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @balletbookworm of course, that’s still MM…which is all in the marketing #litchat -1:43 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @balletbookworm But a movie is less of a committment… #litchat -1:43 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen i feel that tv book clubs and some awards tend to steer people to about 20 or 30 novels #litchat -1:43 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @Chrisbookarama Judging from Cdn writers’ confs, Cdns are writing genre fiction, but may be publishing in US market. #litchat -1:43 PM May 6th, 2009
deberryandgrant @CarolyBurnsBass hear hear.But dark,unrelenting depths of sadness,misery, loss,angst w/o hope are often what makes a bk lit fic #litchat -1:43 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @trishheylady I agree RE the reputation…perhaps folks are hesitant for just that reason? #litchat -1:44 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @trishheylady I’ve heard that “heavy and dark” complaint too. And also, too realistic! #litchat -1:44 PM May 6th, 2009
Chrisbookarama @trishheylady But it’s harder to discuss light fare. #litchat -1:44 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell Definitely a myth that all lit fic is heavy & dark. So much variety! #litchat -1:44 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @jodyreale I think e-books will help with that, if pubs would lower the cost.It’s crazy an e-bk costs not much less than actual bk. #litchat -1:44 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @jdistraction and less work. People don’t want to work for their entertainment anymore, we expect to be served instead of imagining #litchat -1:45 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @jdistraction but $8.50 for 2hrs you’ll never get back (if bad) vs. $7.99 for at least 3 hrs that you can resell if you don’t like #litchat -1:45 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @stujallen true but introduce you to new authors and then can use if you liked this you’ll love these lists #litchat -1:45 PM May 6th, 2009
Chrisbookarama @LoranneBrown I’d like to see more for the CDN crowd but I guess it comes down to the $$$. #litchat -1:45 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @trishheylady I agree much greater difference in music downloads cf CDs #litchat -1:46 PM May 6th, 2009
jackiedoss #litchat Just popping my head in here. Are telling me that Kurt Vonnegut is full of angst and unrelenting depths of sadness and misery? huh -1:46 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @balletbookworm True! I hadn’t considered the resale value! Maybe there’s a marketing point! #litchat -1:46 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen wow my question now best give a answer well think there are few but jonathan littell and safran foer both strike me as class acts #litchat -1:47 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @Chrisbookarama Oh, I agree! I told book club (since I founded it) that I want 2 discuss literature. Contemp is fine, but no fluff. #litchat -1:47 PM May 6th, 2009
jackiedoss #litchat Would you consider Jasper Fforde litfic? -1:47 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @VanessaDobbs That’s just what I was thinking of. #litchat -1:48 PM May 6th, 2009
readandbreathe @EliseBlackwell Yes, but I love heavy and dark books the best! #litchat -1:48 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @jackiedoss Jasper Fforde interesting case. Genre/literary cross-over? #litchat -1:48 PM May 6th, 2009
deberryandgrant @jackiedoss Not on the surface, but if you look beneath, it’s pretty angst ridden. Hilarious, but sad too. #litchat -1:48 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell Great younger lit writers? @EmilyMandel, @MarieMockett, Philipp Meyer, @amymacKinnon all to be watched! #litchat -1:48 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @stujallen agree re Safran Foer, loved Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close #litchat -1:48 PM May 6th, 2009
Chrisbookarama Got to run. Wish I could chat more. #litchat -1:49 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @EliseBlackwell @brookssigler is terrific for chick lit fic #litchat -1:49 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @jackiedoss Jasper Fforde clever but personally I think of litfic as the language working hard. Fforde mainly about jokes. #litchat -1:50 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat @jackiedoss Jasper Fforde is mainstream leaning toward literary. His books draw so much from literature, but are crazy fun. #litchat -1:50 PM May 6th, 2009
susanmpls @trishheylady Told book club I wanted to discuss interesting topics. Read Sophie Kinsella & had gr8 disc. about debt/consumerism #litchat -1:50 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @readandbreathe Hear hear for heavy dark books. But not all litfic IS h&d. #litchat -1:50 PM May 6th, 2009
BooksOnTheBrain @trishheylady That’s my preference too- no chick lit for book club- it’s too easy #litchat -1:51 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @FlossieTeacake “language working hard” that’s a great definition. #litchat -1:51 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell @readandbreathe oh, me too! I confess my VERY favorite books are somber, albeit w/ some texture, but def see trend toward playful #litchat -1:51 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @corb21 Is Chick lit considered literary, mainstream, genre… other? #litchat -1:51 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @FlossieTeacake True, Fforde mainly about jokes. But you need an expensive education to get them. 🙂 #litchat -1:51 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen would foster wallace have forfilled his potental ? #litchat -1:51 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @jdistraction I suppose it depends on the title. #litchat -1:51 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @susanmpls That’s interesting. I hadn’t thought about it that way. #litchat -1:52 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @LoranneBrown yes, they are very *clever* jokes. But it’s a different facet of the word “literary” he’s exposing 🙂 #litchat -1:52 PM May 6th, 2009
CollectedMisc RT: @LitChat: Q2: Literary fiction has perception of being dry, slow and writerly. What current lit fic bks r page turners? #litchat -1:53 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @BooksOnTheBrain Yeah, & something like Shopaholic would just annoy the heck out of me.I could rant about that, but meh 4 bookclub. #litchat -1:53 PM May 6th, 2009
EliseBlackwell I have to bow out, but I’m looking forward to the whole hour on Friday (when I’ll have childcare!). Meanwhile: happy reading! #litchat -1:53 PM May 6th, 2009
jodyreale Right, there must be an opportunity in there somewhere. (And I agree that the cost of eBooks is way too high.) #litchat -1:53 PM May 6th, 2009
darwilli040 @LitChat Interesting article in May issue of Atlantic Journal “How Historical Fiction Went Highbrow”. Somewhat a parallel Fforde. #litchat -1:54 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @CollectedMisc What current lit fic bks r page turners? ALL litfic must be pageturners, or we aren’t published. Can’t be slow. #litchat -1:54 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @EliseBlackwell “Somber but tend toward playful.” Perfect description! Me too! #litchat -1:54 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @CollectedMisc I think both Wally Lamb and Sue Miller (The Senator’s Wife) both write page turners that are deep. #litchat -1:55 PM May 6th, 2009
susanmpls @trishheylady We also read House of Mirth and had a convo about money, priviledge, & changing role of women over generations. #litchat -1:55 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @LoranneBrown I don’t think I agree. The English Patient is almost excruciatingly slow, but also made into movie! #litchat -1:56 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen white tiger and black swan green both page turners #litchat -1:56 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown “language working hard” must sustain tension, plot, character, etc. Yes, page turners that are deep. #litchat -1:56 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass @LoranneBrown @FlossieTeacake Education, expensive or not, isn’t required. To really enjoy Fforde, you must be well read. #litchat -1:56 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake Lots of litfic actually v readable. The Wasted Vigil & The Winter Vault (interesting, share an acronym) seem “hard” but aren’t. #litchat -1:57 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @trishheylady I found anil’sghost really hard going aswell #litchat -1:57 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat @EliseBlackwell Thanks for stopping in again today. I can’t wait until Friday. #litchat -1:57 PM May 6th, 2009
corb21 @LoranneBrown Agreed. Well said. #litchat -1:57 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @trishheylady Eng. Patient pre 9/11. Donald Maass has raised the stakes for all of us. Must write “breakout” novels, or TRY. #litchat -1:57 PM May 6th, 2009
susanmpls Literarish mystery writers: Colin Cotterill; Martin Limon; Peter Lovesey; Magdalen Nabb. #litchat -1:58 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @CarolyBurnsBass really enjoy FForde #litchat -1:58 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @LoranneBrown exactly – but you can have tension, plot & character without really fine writing. Cf Dan Brown & co… #litchat -1:58 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat RT @GerrieFerris: Zip, zero, nada. That’s why they’re lit fic. My books have action, sspnse, romnce no one angsts over their angst. #litchat -1:59 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat Final question from @mitaliperkins: Read any lauded “serious” literary fiction for adults with unabashedly happy endings? #litchat -2:00 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @FlossieTeacake Agreed. “but tension, plot & character without really fine writing” = probably not litfic. #litchat -2:01 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @susanmpls as is Steig Larrson #litchat -2:01 PM May 6th, 2009
Thandelike @flossieteacake that’s what i cannot abide — plot character theme with dull writing #litchat -2:01 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @LitChat does The Secret Scripture count? Everyone hates the ending for being too happy. #litchat -2:02 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @LitChat “The Whistling Season” was pretty happy ending, if I recall. #litchat -2:02 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @Thandelike I agree #litchat -2:02 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @Thandelike QUITE. #litchat -2:02 PM May 6th, 2009
mizwrite RT @LoranneBrown: @FlossieTeacake Hi! Late to party. But I agree, too: without really fine writing = probably not litfic. #litchat -2:02 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @LitChat “unabashedly happy endings” aren’t REAL, so don’t know if that would be in any LIT fic. #litchat -2:02 PM May 6th, 2009
susanmpls @LitChat hate to be a pain, but… what’s happy? do you mean the girl gets the guy or life goes on and no one is miserable? #litchat -2:03 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm @trishheylady excellent point! the HEA does seem to be an ideal/fantasy #litchat -2:03 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @trishheylady “Happy endings” don’t look at a whole life. Book ends here, tomorrow: what fresh hell is this? #litchat -2:04 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @mizwrite agree, but you can lose one of those & it still works. Character an obvious one: can write good allegory with flat chars. #litchat -2:04 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass I am finally reading THE MEMORY OF RUNNING and hoping for a happy ending for this hapless, but endearing character. #litchat -2:05 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @LoranneBrown exactly – look at rash of sequels to classics (Mrs Darcy’s Dilemma etc.). Readers obsess about what happened next. #litchat -2:06 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown I think happy ending = hope for future. May not work out, but there’s a chance it may. It lingers with us as readers. #litchat -2:06 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @LoranneBrown Right. So why do I like happy endings in movies but I pooh pooh them in books? #litchat -2:07 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen i old but walden has a happy ending maybe life of pi and most of w g sebald books postive #litchat -2:07 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @LoranneBrown A hopeful ending is not the same as a happy ending. #litchat -2:07 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @trishheylady You’re a realist. 🙂 You read for truth, movies for escape? #litchat -2:07 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @trishheylady oooh. Good question. #litchat -2:07 PM May 6th, 2009
jdistraction @LoranneBrown I agree. Hopeful is good. #litchat -2:08 PM May 6th, 2009
jackiedoss #litchat I was certainly happy that Love in a Time of Cholera was OVER. The chars seemed happy at end, after boring me to death thruout bk -2:08 PM May 6th, 2009
susanmpls hope for future happy endings: Empress of One by Faith Sullivan. Blindness by Jose Saramago. Ursula, Under by Ingrid Hill #litchat -2:08 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @LoranneBrown That must be it. I think bks more often provide profound thoughts, & that’s what I want from bks.Movies, not so much. #litchat -2:09 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass When I think of happy ending I’m thinking an “ah ha” moment come to fruition thru pages of storytelling. Not the fairytale ending. #litchat -2:09 PM May 6th, 2009
mizwrite I read both: lit fic for amazing way with words, pop fic for amazing skill at pacing/storytelling. They rarely cross ovr for me. #litchat -2:09 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @jdistraction “Hopeful is good.” About as “happy” as you can expect in most litfic. #litchat -2:09 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @trishheylady also think books explore grey areas a lot more – almost feels a let-down if things tied up too neatly. #litchat -2:09 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @susanmpls I don’t know that Blindness had a happy ending. Abslty it was hopeful, tho. Perhaps the ? shld B: what’s a happy ending? #litchat -2:10 PM May 6th, 2009
CarolyBurnsBass Some think her overrated, but I think Zadie Smith is terrific. I especially enjoyed ON BEAUTY. #litchat -2:10 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @FlossieTeacake I agree well put #litchat -2:10 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @CarolyBurnsBass “When I think of happy ending I’m thinking an “ah ha” moment come to fruition thru pages of storytelling.” Agreed #litchat -2:11 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @CarolyBurnsBass so did I #litchat -2:11 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @FlossieTeacake Good point. Books can dig deeper where movies have a harder time because of the medium. #litchat -2:11 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @mizwrite some fabulously plotty lit fic books out there. Pacing different, but real skill forces you to adjust to the book’s pace. #litchat -2:11 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat We’ve cross over our official 1-hour chat time. Feel free to continue the chat, it’s another zesty discussion. #litchat -2:13 PM May 6th, 2009
deberryandgrant @CarolyBurnsBass Perfect. Because Happily Ever After is FICTION, lit or not… #litchat -2:13 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @FlossieTeacake Pacing different, yes. Each writer educates the reader to adapt, change expectations, etc. #litchat -2:13 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat In the meantime, I will copy the chat and post the chatscript on the blog by Friday. #litchat -2:13 PM May 6th, 2009
darwilli040 @mizwrite I agree and maybe that’s the difference. Litfic is character centered more than plot oriented. #litchat -2:13 PM May 6th, 2009
mizwrite @FlossieTeacake True, but “plotty” isn’t good pacing! Good, old-fashioned, around-the-campfire-type pacing is hard to find. #litchat -2:14 PM May 6th, 2009
Thandelike @trishheylady et al. this week a theme i’ve been hearing everywhere: “plot is overrated” #litchat -2:14 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @deberryandgrant Fiction can be “true” to life. Happy every after is NOT true. #litchat -2:14 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen most lit is eye opening and thought provking #litchat -2:14 PM May 6th, 2009
trishheylady @LitChat Thanks for facilitating #litchat! -2:14 PM May 6th, 2009
LitChat Thanks everyone for your insights and opinions. Be sure to come back on Friday for #EliseBlackwell guest hosting. 4 pm/edt. #litchat -2:15 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake First I’ve tried via tweetchat – fantastic! Thanks @litchat. #litchat -2:15 PM May 6th, 2009
balletbookworm thanks @litchat! 🙂 #litchat -2:15 PM May 6th, 2009
VanessaDobbs @litchat thanks once again #litchat -2:15 PM May 6th, 2009
deberryandgrant @LoranneBrown absolutely. Fiction has to be truer to life than life actually is. #litchat -2:15 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @Thandelike “plot IS overrated”. To be “true”, must be character-driven, not plot driven. #litchat -2:16 PM May 6th, 2009
stujallen thanks litchat #litchat -2:16 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown Yes, thanks for my first try. Great talking with you all. #litchat -2:16 PM May 6th, 2009
FlossieTeacake @mizwrite “plotty” *can* be good pacing… sometimes. I love a book that compels you to slow down & absorb its own rhythms though. #litchat -2:16 PM May 6th, 2009
darwilli040 @litchat Once again thanks for a good discussion. #litchat -2:16 PM May 6th, 2009
mizwrite Awesome chat, @litchat and everyone! Sorry I came so late. I’ll catch all the great comments in the search and blog. … Thx! #litchat -2:18 PM May 6th, 2009
LoranneBrown @deberryandgrant Great point: “Fiction has to be truer to life than life actually is.” #litchat -2:19 PM May 6th, 2009
deberryandgrant @LoranneBrown as a writer, when making stuff up, it has to have some kind of logic that fits the story,makes sense to the character #litchat -2:21 PM May 6th, 2009
deberryandgrant @LoranneBrown even if it doesn’t. But it can’t go unexplained, unreasoned like we have to accept in real life. #litchat -2:22 PM May 6th, 2009
deberryandgrant @LoranneBrown but that doesn’t necessarily mean a happy ending… #litchat -2:23 PM May 6th, 2009
llunalila Writing madly, didn’t have time to pop in but had and idea and needed to put it down before it went. I’ll try to come on Friday to #litchat -2:26 PM May 6th, 2009
mizwrite @CarolyBurnsBass I agree — plot is everything! Otherwise, it’s just a character sketch! #litchat -2:29 PM May 6th, 2009
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